The Business of Art : How to help your favorite artists, makers, nonprofits, and small businesses without spending a dime

My professional background is in marketing and communication and public relations. Before Sam came along it was my job to be a megaphone about community events, fundraising, exercise classes, a mother's right to breastfeed in public... All kinds of things. 

Through that experience I've learned several ways that you as a fangirl / potential customer / client can cheer of your favorite creative person via (mostly) social media. These things will cost nothing but your time but could mean the world to them. 

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"Like" their posts on Facebook. 

Seriosuly, the easiest thing ever. Likes beget likes. The more a post is viewed, clicked or otherwise interacted with the more likely the robots at Facebook will think, "oh- this must be good stuff. We should show it to others." 

Have an extra 10 seconds? 

Comment on their post.

If a "like" is worth one (theoretical) point a comment is worth ten. A comment that's a question (How long have you been working on this? What's your process? Where can I buy these?) is worth 50 points because it allows even more interaction.

Remeber: the "point system" doesn't exist but the impact totally does. 

Go to their events.

Because events seem like these big glamour loud hibgs but at the end of the day it's a lot of hard work with no reward if no one shows up. 

Which brings me to... 

RSVP to their events online.

even if you're not 100% you can go. RSVP-ing often shows up in your friends' feed which gives them an opportunity to learn about an event they may not have known about otherwise. 

Share these events  / posts / images. 

I know it seems like if we "love!" someone's work it should be apparent to all of our friends and neighbors. But chances are they don't. So let the world know of your adoration. You could have a chance to introduce someone to their new favorite artist. How cool would that be? 

Connect people. 

This has become my new most favorite hobby. Have a friend who is starting a boutique? Connect her to your favorite candle maker. If your cousin is a burgeoning writer, introduce him to your favorite baker and suggest he write a feature about her work. Know an interior designer who is always on the hunt for that perfect piece? Introduce her to your favorite craftsman. 

All of this stuff is the opposite of hard and the warm fuzzies you'll get from supporting someone whose work you appreciate is always magical. 

Ps. Just because this article has "without spending a dime" in the title doesn't mean you shouldn't support them with your money as well. Artists can't live on warm fuzzies alone; the electric company doesn't take warm fuzzies as payment.